50 Cent Sends Warning Shot: ‘Suge Knight Better Watch His Step!

Suge Knight has been a menace to society ever since he made his way into the music industry.

Back in the day everyone knew that his name meant trouble, no matter who you were and what you did.

Like the tome Suge Knight tried to intimidate 50 Cent and it totally backfired. In fact even though it been years, 50 has still not forgotten and still believes that Suge Knight should not to cross his path again or it might get ugly.

You see, 50 Cent and Suge Knight actually met more than just once. They actually had several encounters, but the encounters were quite different from the ones that Suge usually had and that’s what makes them so interesting.

These two are both guys that you don’t wanna beef with so let’s get into more details about what made these two come at each other so hard.

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On paper, the scenario seemed unbelievable.

Recording artists Drake, 50 Cent, Chris Brown, Trey Songz and The Game are all registered to vote at the same beige, $300,000 house in a modest new development in Katy.

Nobody was more perplexed than the homeowners, who said they were unaware of the celebrities’ registrations. Neighbors said they had not seen any of the Grammy-nominated artists grilling outside, mowing the lawn or washing their cars.

It wasn’t a new reality TV show, but it appears to have been a prank perpetrated by someone who registered the artists to vote without their knowledge, armed only with their legal names and dates of birth. It did not even require an ID.

Amanda Ruisi, a representative for 50 Cent, said the rapper did not register to vote at the Katy house and had no idea somebody signed him up to vote there. His attorney started looking into the matter after the Chronicle reached out.

The Chronicle made numerous efforts to reach representatives for the other artists but was not successful.

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The apparent prank shines a spotlight on a potential loophole in federal voting registration law that allows virtually anyone to register friends, enemies or celebrities to vote. Whether the intent is malicious or not, experts say it is still illegal.

This case is high profile because it involves famous celebrities, said Randall Erben, a law professor at the University of Texas at Austin who served as assistant secretary of state in Texas from 1989 to 1991.

But the scheme likely would not allow anyone to actually cast fraudulent ballots, since they would not have one of the approved IDs to vote in Texas. And none of the five artists registered at the Katy house cast a ballot in last year’s elections, so no actual voter fraud occurred.

State law outlines strict penalties for submitting false or fraudulent registration forms in the first place. The crime, then, is high risk and low reward, says Erben.

“These people are either committing high misdemeanors or felonies,” Erben said of whoever registered the celebrities to vote. “This is not fooling around.”

Records from the Harris County Tax Assessor’s Office show someone filled out registration applications for each of the men on Aug. 15, a day when Drake was performing 1,500 miles away in Inglewood, Calif. Each form appears to have been filled out by the same person, according to a handwriting expert.

State law only allows a spouse, parent or child acting as an agent to fill out the forms on someone’s behalf, meaning one person could not have legally submitted the forms for all five men.

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Usually, people provide a Texas driver’s license number, Texas personal ID or the last four digits of their Social Security number to confirm their identity. But, in compliance with federal law, there is an option on the voter registration form to say that you do not have any of those three forms of identification.

In those cases, the filer only needs to provide full legal names and birth dates – information readily available online for celebrities. Whoever registered the five artists at the Katy house checked that box indicating they did not have an ID on each of the forms.

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